100% Organic - A Column From Search Engine Land As I'm reviewing company websites to prepare for our August SEO Training Class, I'm struck by how often I see the same website mistakes.

Since we've been offering the SEO classes over the past 7 months, we've reviewed over 40 websites. In each class of 6 online marketers, there's never a dearth of problems to point out to them. I'm not talking about minor glitches here, but stuff that prevents the website from reaching its full potential with the search engines. In other words, as long as these problems exist, they're not going to be able to gain all the targeted search engine traffic that they could be.

To put it into terms that anyone can relate to--the company is basically losing money every day they don't fix their website.

Here are 6 common website mistakes that could be costing you money:

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6 Common Website Mistakes That Are Costing You Money


100% Organic - A Column From Search Engine Land
As I’m reviewing company websites to prepare for our August SEO Training Class, I’m struck by how often I see the same website mistakes.

Since we’ve been offering the SEO classes over the past 7 months, we’ve reviewed over 40 websites. In each class of 6 online marketers, there’s never a dearth of problems to point out to them. I’m not talking about minor glitches here, but stuff that prevents the website from reaching its full potential with the search engines. In other words, as long as these problems exist, they’re not going to be able to gain all the targeted search engine traffic that they could be.

To put it into terms that anyone can relate to–the company is basically losing money every day they don’t fix their website.

Here are 6 common website mistakes that could be costing you money:

1. JavaScript or other crawler-unfriendly navigation that may impede indexing. Most newer sites don’t have this problem, but there’s almost always at least 1 site we review in every class that has its main navigation pretty much invisible to the search engines. If your navigation basically doesn’t exist as far as Google is concerned, then it’s very difficult to get all of the pages of your website indexed.

2. Navigation that buries important pages within the site architecture. The deeper that pages are buried within the website, the less importance they are given. For SEO, as well as usability purposes, it’s often helpful to showcase important sections of the website up an additional level in the site’s hierarchy. This can usually be achieved via a search-friendly CSS mouse-over menu.

3. Duplicate “pages” getting indexed under multiple URLs. While Google has, for the most part, worked out many of their canonical issues of the past and now generally realize that www.example.com/index.php is the same as www.example.com, many content management systems (CMS) take things a step further and provide a whole array of URLs for any one particular page of content. Sometimes this is done purposely for tracking reasons, as with session ids or tracking links appended to the end of URLs; but other times, it’s simply done because the CMS was never designed with search engines in mind. This is not a good thing, as it can cause the spiders to be so busy indexing the same content that they miss the more important stuff.

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