JQuery was developed by John Resig at BarCamp NYC and was released on January 2006. It is a lightweight JavaScript library that assists in the rapid development of powerful client side scripts. Interaction of JavaScript with the underlying DOM (HTML) of the web page and its associated CSS in a more procedural manner is basically what JQuery has to offer.

JQuery is dual licensed under the GNU General Public License and the MIT License and is hence, free and open source. This allows you to either manipulate the source or implement its range of functions in your scripts for free.

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jQuery vs. MooTools

JQuery was developed by John Resig at BarCamp NYC and was released on January 2006. It is a lightweight JavaScript library that assists in the rapid development of powerful client side scripts. Interaction of JavaScript with the underlying DOM (HTML) of the web page and its associated CSS in a more procedural manner is basically what JQuery has to offer.

JQuery is dual licensed under the GNU General Public License and the MIT License and is hence, free and open source. This allows you to either manipulate the source or implement its range of functions in your scripts for free.

Recently, Nokia and Microsoft have announced plans to bundle JQuery on their platforms. Nokia has plans to integrate this tool on their Web Run-Time platform, while Microsoft is gearing up to provide this framework with their ASP.NET AJAX and ASP.NET MVC framework in particular and the Visual Studio environment in general.

We had a brief discussion on MooTools last week. Though JQuery and MooTools are similar tools by nature and provide the developers with almost the same set of features, however they have minor differences and are unique in their own way.

Chaining of functions together to perform multiple operations on the DOM at the same time is a default and beautiful feature of JQuery that developers can make use of to develop code rapidly. It also has support for CSS 1-3 and basic XPath and hence gives you more control over the design layout of your page. JQuery has a nifty set of utilities to offer that include browser version, each function, AJAX and support for JavaScript plugins to mention a few. This tool also provides you an event based control over your page and manipulation of the DOM based on events.

Effects and Animations can also be developed using the JQuery platform but however, I personally felt MooTools scores over JQuery in this regard. So, if you want rapid code development with standard animations and a neat look and feel, go for JQuery. If however, you are on the lookout to deliver more eye-candy animations all over your page, MooTools should be the obvious choice.

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2 Responses »

  1. Hello Akshay

    I think your list of differences between JQuery and MooTools is misleading. MooTools has much of what you list in that paragraph. I think the basic difference is in philosophy. MooTools is really meant for advanced developers who tend to write their own plugins or at least customize the plugins they use. It’s meant to be a simple framework that developers build upon. So MooTools isn’t as friendly as JQuery for the novice javascripter who just wants to drop in a couple of plugins. Not that advanced developers cannot or don’t use JQuery. They certainly can and do.

    Bob

  2. Bob and Akshay,

    There will always be a conflict between Mootool and jQuery users as both have different sets of features to offer. I would like to share my experience in this regard. I felt MooTools is more friendly than jQuery as I learned the former more quickly. I guess it is a mere matter of choice as to wich one an individual would be using. The chaining features of methods in jQuery seemed more complicated. The primary reason for my quick learning of Moo was its extensive and exhaustive discussions available at the moo forum. I was a novice “javascripter”. But not now, thanks to MooTools.

    Bob, I guess “Not that advanced developers cannot or don’t use JQuery.” is not what the motive of this article is. You have probably misinterpreted it. It has simply presented the user’s point of view. You may have a different point.

    Akshay, the article was a good read. Keep more of them coming!

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